" the proper response to a desire to objectify someone is to like that person, however when we are encouraged to objectify them the proper response is not to like that person (there is no proper response) "

- philosophy of the body  

Philosophy

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Philosophy of the Body

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" vindicates the objectified by bringing to surface (or creating the impression of) inherent faults in the observer, and the necessary action to forgive others (in particular the objectified) for their failures - it may therefore be used as a means of protection or a method for obtaining nice treatment "

- philosophy of the body  


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